Wed, 17 Aug 2022

Japan, South Korea Leaders Meet on Sidelines of NATO Summit

Voice of America
29 Jun 2022, 22:05 GMT+10

Seoul - The top leaders of South Korea and Japan expressed hopes for improved bilateral relations during a brief meeting Tuesday on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Madrid, Spain.

South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida met for about three to four minutes during a dinner hosted by Spain's King Felipe VI, according to the South Korean presidential office.

Yoon told Kishida he plans to "resolve pending issues between Korea and Japan as soon as possible" so that the two countries can "move forward in a future-oriented manner," Seoul officials said.

Kishida said he hoped the South Korean president would restore "extremely severe relations" to a "healthy state," according to Japan's Kyodo news agency.

It was the first face-to-face meeting between the top leaders of South Korea and Japan since December 2019. Since then, ties have plummeted due to lingering disputes related to Japan's brutal 1910-1945 occupation of Korea.

Spain's King Felipe poses for a family photo with US President Biden, Bulgaria's President Radev, South Korea's President Yoon Suk-yeol, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and other leaders in Madrid, June 28, 2022. Spain's King Felipe poses for a family photo with US President Biden, Bulgaria's President Radev, South Korea's President Yoon Suk-yeol, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and other leaders in Madrid, June 28, 2022.

Yoon, who took office last month, is a conservative who has promised greater cooperation with Japan on issues such as North Korea, which has accelerated its nuclear weapons development.

FILE -South Korea's new President Yoon Suk Yeol waves from a car after the Presidential Inauguration outside the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, May 10, 2022. This week, he will represent South Korea at the NATO summit in Madrid. FILE -South Korea's new President Yoon Suk Yeol waves from a car after the Presidential Inauguration outside the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, May 10, 2022. This week, he will represent South Korea at the NATO summit in Madrid.

What to Expect From South Korea's First NATO Summit

Yoon and Kishida, who have both aligned their countries in a more explicitly pro-Western direction, are attending the NATO meeting as observers. It is the first time the top leaders of South Korea and Japan have attended a NATO summit.

On Wednesday, Yoon and Kishida will meet U.S. President Joe Biden for a trilateral summit in Madrid. The meeting will focus mainly on North Korea, according to White House National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan.

South Korea and Japan are both key allies of the United States, but are often suspicious of each other. Occasional flare-ups in the countries' historical disputes have posed a major challenge to trilateral cooperation on issues such as North Korea or China.

Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speaks at a news conference following the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) leaders meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, May 24, 2022. Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speaks at a news conference following the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) leaders meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, May 24, 2022.

Japan's Kishida Considers Joining NATO Summit -Sources

The latest round of tensions was sparked in part by recent South Korean court rulings ordering Japanese companies to compensate Koreans who were forced to work during Japan's colonial occupation of Korea.

Japan says the reparations issue was resolved with a 1965 treaty that normalized Japan-South Korea relations. It has complained that subsequent South Korean governments have not accepted further Japanese apologies and attempts to make amends.

Japanese and South Korean officials had hinted that Yoon and Kishida may hold a longer meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit. But subsequent media reports indicated that more substantive engagement may have to wait until Japan holds key upper house elections next month.

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